Novichok poisoning: Murder inquiry after Dawn Sturgess dies


Dawn Sturgess

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Dawn Sturgess collapsed at a flat in Amesbury on 30 June

Police have launched a murder inquiry after a woman exposed to nerve agent Novichok in Wiltshire died.

Dawn Sturgess, 44, died in hospital on Sunday evening after falling critically ill on 30 June.

Charlie Rowley, 45, who was also exposed to the nerve agent in Amesbury, remains critically ill in hospital.

Theresa May said she was “appalled and shocked” by the death, which comes after the poisoning of Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia in Salisbury.

A post-mortem examination of Ms Sturgess, from Durrington, is due to take place and her family has been informed, police said.

The investigation is being led by detectives from the Counter-Terrorism Policing Network and about 100 detectives are working on the case alongside Wiltshire Police.

Officers are still trying to work out how Ms Sturgess and Mr Rowley were exposed to the nerve agent although tests have confirmed they touched a contaminated item with their hands.

Assistant Commissioner Neil Basu, the head of UK Counter-Terrorism policing, said: “This is shocking and tragic news. Dawn leaves behind her family, including three children, and our thoughts and prayers are with them at this extremely difficult time.

“The 45-year-old man who fell ill with Dawn remains critically ill in hospital and our thoughts are with him and his family as well.”

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The couple touched a contaminated item with their hands but police have not identified the source

Mr Basu said the death “has only served to strengthen our resolve to identify and bring to justice the person or persons responsible for what I can only describe as an outrageous, reckless and barbaric act”.

He said: “Detectives will continue with their painstaking and meticulous work to gather all the available evidence so that we can understand how two citizens came to be exposed with such a deadly substance that tragically cost Dawn her life.”

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Media captionFootage shows Ms Sturgess in Salisbury days before her collapse

Dr Christine Blanshard, medical director at Salisbury District Hospital where Ms Sturgess died, said it was “desperately sad” and she expressed condolences to the 44-year-old’s family.

She said: “The staff here at Salisbury District Hospital worked tirelessly to save Dawn. Our staff are talented, dedicated and professional and I know today they will be hurting too.

“They did everything they could.”

Mr Rowley is also being treated at the hospital.

‘Murderers’

Mrs May sent her “thoughts and condolences” and said officials are “working urgently to establish the facts”.

She said: “The government is committed to providing full support to the local community as it deals with this tragedy.”

British diplomat Julian King, the European Commissioner responsible for the EU’s security union, said: “Those behind this are murderers.”

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The couple collapsed at a flat on Muggleton Road in Amesbury on 30 June

Public Health England said the risk to the general public “remains low”.

Professor Paul Cosford said: “As a precaution we still advise the public not to pick up any strange items such as needles, syringes or unusual containers.”

He also said people in five locations between 22:00 BST on 29 June and 18:30 on 30 June continue to follow advice, namely: “Wash your clothes in a washing machine and to keep your items double-bagged and securely fastened, if they are dry-clean only.”

Those locations are Muggleton Road, Boots pharmacy and the Baptist church in Amebsury, and John Baker House and Queen Elizabeth Gardens in Salisbury.

‘Unwilling victim’

Angus Macpherson, Wiltshire police and crime commissioner, said he was “horrified and appalled”.

He said: “Ms Sturgess was an innocent member of the public who should have been able to go about her daily life without becoming an unwilling victim in such an unprecedented, international, incident.”

The poisoning of the Skripals, both of whom spent weeks in hospital before being discharged, was blamed by the UK government on Russia.

Russian authorities denied any involvement.

After the hospitalisation of Ms Sturgess and Mr Rowley, Home Secretary Sajid Javid accused the Russian state of using Britain as a “dumping ground for poison”.

The Russian Embassy hit back, accusing the government of trying to “muddy the waters” and “frighten its own citizens”.

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Yulia Skripal and her father Sergei were exposed to Novichok in Salisbury in March

In a statement, the Met Police said the possibility the poisoning of the Skripals and Ms Sturgess and Mr Rowley are linked is a “clear line of inquiry”.

A spokesman said the investigators are “not in a position to say whether the nerve agent was from the same batch that the Skirpals were exposed to”.

He also said: “There is no evidence that (Ms Sturgess and Mr Rowley) visited any of the sites that were decontaminated following the attempted murders of Sergei and Yulia Skripal in March.”



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